Water – Use It Wisely

Water conservation is something we hear about during the summer months and times of drought. The truth is  we need to be conscious of our water consumption throughout the year, even autumn, winter and spring.

Credit: Kecko via Flickr

Credit: Kecko via Flickr – Image shows how far the water level has dropped in Lake Constance in Staad, Switzerland

It is important to conserve water for many reasons, the biggest of which also being the simplest: the fact that the fresh water supply is a finite natural resource. The supply at any given time tends to be so great that we sometimes forget this fact, but the truth is that we can run out of fresh water.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is produced in partnership between the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is produced in partnership between the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Additionally, large amounts of energy are required to provide houses and businesses with running water. In fact, the EPA states that running a faucet for just five minutes uses about the same amount of energy required to power a 60-watt light bulb for 14 hours.

Credit: mrlaugh via Flickr - Lake Travis in the Austin, TX area is definitely NOT supposed to look this way...

Credit: mrlaugh via Flickr – Lake Travis in the Austin, TX area is definitely NOT supposed to look this way…

So what can you do to help this problem? There are many year round water-saving efforts everyone can make from the comfort of their own home.

Credit: FMSC via Flickr - shows the destruction caused by drought in Somalia

Credit: FMSC via Flickr – shows the destruction caused by drought in Somalia

Here are a few recommendations from the WeatherBug Meteorology team:

  • Check all plumbing and faucets for leaks – one drop per second wastes 2,700 gal per year.
  • Replace older toilets with new, low-volume toilets.
  • Purchase Energy Star labeled washing machines
  • Take quick showers – five minutes or less is best, using low-pressure shower heads.
  • Don’t leave the water running while washing, shaving or brushing your teeth.
  • Water your yard and plants in the early or late part of the day to reduce evaporation
  • Plant drought tolerant grasses, shrubs and trees; these require less watering.
Credit: qf8 via Flickr

Credit: qf8 via Flickr

Save water. Every drop counts. All the cool kids are doing it… do your part! - Know Before™

Credit: oddsock via Flickr

Credit: oddsock via Flickr

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This entry was posted in General, Nature.