First Person: Got Wind?

By WeatherBug’s Meggen Wright
Dog and THE Boot

Sometimes even WeatherBug’s own staff can take the power of Mother Nature for granted.

We talk about the weather all day long around here, and often it’s about the forces that can cause so much destruction. All of us are keenly familiar with the incredible energy behind tornadoes, hurricanes and lightning storms.

Personally, I have never had a close encounter with really extreme weather, not counting Nor’easters of course. Fortunately, I have the opportunity of living right across the street from the Atlantic Ocean in New Hampshire. The weather at the beach is very different from what’s going on only a half-mile inland. It’s also very different from my front porch to the end of the short side street I live on where it intersects the main Ocean Blvd strip. Once you walk past the homes and four-story condo buildings on this side street, the wind and the temperature have a mind of their own.

Before I venture outside, I look at the thermometer on the outside window, I look at my WeatherBug App, and I deduct the temperature they show by at least 10 degrees because I learned quickly that the difference can be that extreme only 1 block away –the open beach is that big of a factor..

One evening in early February, the wind picked up speed so quickly and ferociously,  that I could hear the waves crashing from inside my house. My dog had not had her evening walk yet, so, given the crazy wind I could hear through the walls, I thought it would be a better idea to just let her relieve herself on a bush just across the parking lot.

Ever have one of those moments when you think something is a good idea, and then it suddenly becomes a really bad one? No sooner did I open the front door and my eyes were the size of saucers, shocked and caught off guard at how hard the wind was gusting. I remember thinking, okay,  go down the front stairs and let her use the parking lot as the restroom, forget the bush across the lot!
I reached the beginning of the stair case and the wind was circling around under the covered porch roof and like a Giant’s hand, shoved me down the stairs. My feet could not keep up with the push force and I barely got my toes in contact with each step, except the last one.

Next thing I know, I have landed hard, really, really hard onto the asphalt on my left foot and came crashing down onto my knees. Instantly I suspected I broke my foot and no one could hear me yelling. I saw roof shingles blowing by, garbage cans rolling past and here I am laying down in a dark parking lot with no cell phone and my dog standing over me. Eventually I got my wits about me and crawled, literally, back up the stairs and into the house.

So, three lessons to share with you:

  1. If you absolutely have to go out in bad weather of any kind, even if it’s just in your own yard, bring a phone or a whistle, and let someone know you are going outside, just in case you need to get someone’s attention.
  2. If you are caught in high winds, best to lower your center of gravity and scoot on hands and knees, or take each stair sitting on your bum.
  3. The dog can wait.

P.S. Although I’m back to work for WeatherBug, I did severely break a big bone in my foot and have months of recovery time. Living where I do, I assure you I will never take Mother Nature for granted again and have the attitude that She can’t hurt me on my own front porch.

About the Author: This first person account was written by Meggen Wright, a member of WeatherBug’s Advertising Operation team.

Image: The dog looks so sad for Meggen’s broken foot. (Meggen Wright, WeatherBug)

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This entry was posted in General, Safety.
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