Fear of Floods Ease in Buffalo

A week after the region was hit by record-breaking lake-effect storms, authorities are keeping an eye on rising creek levels as the snow melts. Snowfall across the region ranged from less than a foot to about 7 and half feet.

Historic lake effect snow hits Buffalo New York area - Anthony Quintano (Flickr)

Historic lake effect snow hits Buffalo New York area – Anthony Quintano (Flickr)

The National Weather Service issued a flood warning through late Tuesday afternoon for parts of a five-county area in western New York, including Erie County. Moderate flooding is possible along some creeks in the area, but worries of disastrous flooding have all but evaporated.

New York Army National Guard Soldiers from Company A, 427th Brigade Support Battalion, based in Rochester, assist in snow removal - New York National Guard (Flickr)

New York Army National Guard Soldiers from Company A, 427th Brigade Support Battalion, based in Rochester, assist in snow removal – New York National Guard (Flickr)

Early Tuesday saw wind gusts up to 40 mph but reported power outages were few. All public schools in Buffalo have reopened after being shut down due to the storms last week. However, some districts in the hardest-hit areas outside the city won’t resume classes until next Monday.

Roof-top snow fall in Buffalo, NY 2014 - SonnyandSandy (Flickr)

Roof-top snow fall in Buffalo, NY 2014 – SonnyandSandy (Flickr)

Crews have removed 11,000 truckloads of snow from Buffalo neighborhoods and the Red Cross has set up an emergency shelter in case flooding, roof collapses or power outages force evacuations. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said state-deployed pumps and sandbags were in place as rain and temperatures over 60° rapidly melts the snow.

Neighborhoods under snow - Grant Frederiksen (Flickr)

Neighborhoods under snow – Grant Frederiksen (Flickr)

Stay safe! Know Before™.

The WeatherBug – Earth Networks Team

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This entry was posted in Flooding, Snow, Winter.