Explosion Over Arizona – Big Meteor Shower Begins!

On December 10th, a loud boom rocked the skies over Tucson, Arizona, causing residents eating dinner to rush outside and point to the skies. This seemed to be a sneak preview to the largest meteor shower of the year, as a humongous meteorite roared overhead.

Rattling homes as it exploded, it quickly vanished as fast as it had appeared. Luckily, a dash cam was able to capture this event:


The annual Geminid meteor shower officially starts Thursday, December 12th and is expected to inundate the skies with 100 to 120 meteors an hour at its peak Friday night, and coming to an end December 16th. “Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids are by far the most massive,” says NASA astronomer Bill Cooke. “When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500.

Most meteor showers are caused by comets, but Geminid is caused by a large space rock named 3200 Pheathon that flings the debris that cause this spectacular show.

Check out these awesome photos from past Geminids:

Credit: BiancaDanny via Flickr

Credit: BiancaDanny via Flickr

Credit: Daniel Chanliev via Flickr

Credit: Daniel Chanliev via Flickr

Credit: European Southern Observatory via Flickr

Credit: European Southern Observatory via Flickr

Credit: BiancaDanny via Flickr

Credit: BiancaDanny via Flickr

Credit: St0rmz via Flickr

Credit: St0rmz via Flickr

 

Stay Safe. Know Before™.

The WeatherBug – Earth Networks Team

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