Go Inside the Storm: the Granbury, TX Tornado

Take a look inside the tornado with these exclusive pictures from our network. Here’s what the Texas storm cells and tornadoes looked like on our network.

Credit: WeatherBug - Local storm reports indicate that the tornado touched down at 8:06pm CDT last night.  This is a view inside the storm cell that spawned the tornado.  Granbury is noted by the red marker, and the yellow symbols represent IC (intra-cloud) and CG (cloud to ground) lightning.  Note the heavy concentration of yellow, a clear indicator of storm severity.  The polygons represent our Dangerous Thunderstorm Alerts (DTAs in purple) and National Weather Service watches and warnings  (in yellow and red).

Credit: WeatherBug – Local storm reports indicate that the tornado touched down at 8:06pm CDT last night. This is a view inside the storm cell that spawned the tornado. Granbury is noted by the red marker, and the yellow symbols represent IC (intra-cloud) and CG (cloud to ground) lightning. Note the heavy concentration of yellow, a clear indicator of storm severity. The polygons represent our Dangerous Thunderstorm Alerts (DTAs in purple) and National Weather Service watches and warnings (in yellow and red).

Only WeatherBug-Earth Networks is measuring, in real-time, both lightning that hits the ground and the majority of lightning in the clouds that you may not even be able to see – what meteorologists call “total” lightning. 

Credit: WeatherBug - High total lightning rates are a leading indicator of severe storms.  The Granbury, Texas storm produced among the highest lightning rates we’ve seen, with a peak of 160 flashes per minute.  That’s 10X the lightning rate of a typical thunderstorm!  We also pay attention to the ratio of IC (intra-cloud lightning) to CG (cloud to ground lightning), and this storm cell had a 10:1 ratio, another indicator of storm severity.  No wonder that storm cell produced a tornado, one that from preliminary reports was an F-4.

Credit: WeatherBug – High total lightning rates are a leading indicator of severe storms. The Granbury, Texas storm produced among the highest lightning rates we’ve seen, with a peak of 160 flashes per minute. That’s 10X the lightning rate of a typical thunderstorm! We also pay attention to the ratio of IC (intra-cloud lightning) to CG (cloud to ground lightning), and this storm cell had a 10:1 ratio, another indicator of storm severity. No wonder that storm cell produced a tornado, one that from preliminary reports was an F-4.

Tracking and measuring both types of lightning strikes enable WeatherBug to let you Know Before™ dangerous thunderstorms and lighting are striking! No other weather provider or app can do this.

Credit: The WeatherBug Meteorology team

Credit: The WeatherBug Meteorology team

The same storm system that walloped North Texas last night, is bringing the threat for large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes to the Arklatex region today (region where Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, and Oklahoma intersect).

WeatherBug's Spark showing how far lightning is away from Shreveport, LA.

WeatherBug’s Spark showing how far lightning is away from Shreveport, LA.

WeatherBugs' Spark showing lightning map. Number on lightning bolts indicate the number of observed strikes.

WeatherBugs’ Spark showing lightning map. Number on lightning bolts indicate the number of observed strikes.

If you live in an affected area, we urge you to download the WeatherBug mobile app and ensure that severe weather alerts are enabled. Be sure to check Spark to see if it is safe for you and your loved ones to be outdoors (see above for screen caps). Get exclusive Dangerous Thunderstorm Alerts, plus NWS severe weather warnings.

Download WeatherBug w/ Spark for Android:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.aws.android

Download WeatherBug w/ Spark for iPhone:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/weatherbug/id281940292

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This entry was posted in Storm, Tornadoes, WeatherBug Product.